Monthly Archives: March 2011

Godzilla Hedge Funds Fannie Mae, Freddie Were ‘Guaranteed to Fail’: Books

The latest book by the NYU Stern professors is reviewed. A number, like a picture, can be worth 1,000 words. In England, 1066 means the Norman Conquest. The world over, 3.14159 screams pi. For Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the … Continue reading

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How to Reinvigorate the US Mortgage Market

Professor Viral Acharya comments on US Treasury’s recently released proposal. The longer the Obama administration waits to re-engage the private sector, the harder it will be to reverse the trend of state sponsored mortgages, writes NYU professor and European Systemic … Continue reading

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NYU Stern’s latest work on the financial crisis, “Guaranteed to Fail: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac,and the Debacle of Mortgage Finance”

NYU Stern’s latest work on the financial crisis, focusing on the GSEs: “Guaranteed to Fail: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Debacle of Mortgage Finance” (Princeton University Press) was published this week. Please visit the NYU Stern website, to see … Continue reading

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Webinar: “BP’s Failure to Debias: Underscoring the Importance of Behavioral Corporate Finance”

Presented by Hersh Shefrin, Professor of Finance at Santa Clara University, Faculty member Master of Science in Risk Management Program at NYU Stern. Based on the joint work with Enrico Cervellanti, University of Bologna this presentation will cover a behavioral … Continue reading

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JPMorgan Leads $22 Billion Increase in U.S. Banks’ Payouts

Professor Matt Richardson says stress tests should have been more severe to identify which banks would present big risk to the overall financial system. U.S. bank investors may have been rewarded with an extra $22billion annually after government tests showed … Continue reading

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NYU Stern Professor to Advise European Systemic Risk Board

Professor Viral Acharya is selected to be on the Advisory Scientific Committee (ASC) of the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB). The General Board of the European Systemic Risk Board (ESRB) held its first regular meeting today, after the inaugural meeting … Continue reading

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Fannie and Freddie: a Fool’s Errand

Review of NYU Stern professors’ new book. Guaranteed to Fail: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Debacle of Mortgage Finance, by Viral Acharya, Matthew Richardson, Stijn van Nieuwerburgh, Lawrence J White, Princeton, RRP £16.95, $24.95. It is comforting to think of … Continue reading

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US Banks Plead to Limit Range of Swap Rules

Professor Viral Acharya comments on swap rules. US banks are urging regulators writing new rules for the derivatives markets under 2010′s Dodd-Frank Act to keep their hands off the banks’ swaps businesses in London and other overseas financial centres. The … Continue reading

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Remove the Risk Incentive from Bankers’ Pay

Professors Jennifer Carpenter and Ingo Walter have published a new op-ed in the Financial Times. Nothing about the financial crisis has done more to outrage the public and fuel reform than the drumbeat of bankers’ pay announcements. Pay levels at … Continue reading

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Webinar: “Inside Job: Reputational Risk and Conflicts of Interest in Banking and Finance”

Banks, ratings agencies, insurance companies, policy makers and regulators are a few of the actors grappling with questions surrounding the balance between market discipline and market regulation in controlling conflicts of interest and reputational capital. Professor Ingo Walter will talk … Continue reading

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